Top A-level Economics revision tips

October 28, 2016

Studying for you’re A-levels Economics? Whether you’re learning the market mechanism, macroeconomic policy, or the price determination, follow these top revision tips to achieve those top grade.

Start early

What I mean by early is weeks, not days before the exam. Many students leave revision to the last minute and they are not able to cover all syllabus before the exam. If you’ve just returned from home and you are still confused by production or costs, don’t leave it until the week before your A-level exam. Go over it as soon as possible and find additional resources online.

Know what you’ll need to know

First step is to print a copy of syllabus that you’re studying and ensure that it’s the right exam board. The syllabus will include everything what you need to revise so don’t waste time learning topics that they are not on the syllabus. My top tip is to read the examiner’s report! These reports are extremely useful and include details of what students from the previous year did right and wrong. Secondly, they are written by the people who will be marking your exam paper so it is worth to have a look at them.

Create a revision timetable and make sure you stick to it

First of all, work out how many topics you need to revise and break each topic down into shorter sections. This way, you will not feel discouraged and overwhelmed by an amount of revision you need to do. Just remember to set realistic targets as some topics might take longer to learn. In my opinion, a weekly ‘to-do’ list is always helpful. After you’ve covered a section of the syllabus, tick it off on your timetable and move to the next one. Also remember to highlight any sections that you’ve found difficult and discuss them with your tutor or teacher.  

Find a good place to study

Revising in front of TV is not a good idea, no matter how much you love Big Bang Theory. Try revising in your study room, the library, kitchen, a coffee shop – whatever works for you.

Don’t get distracted by social media

It is so easy to get distracted by social media: Facebook, Twitter and others… Make sure you switch off all your social media accounts and don’t let others distract you during revision.

Revise actively

Simply reading page after page from a textbook is not enough to achieve top grades. Making your own notes can be slower but you’ll be able to remember more by hand writing those difficult economic definitions or drawing those complicated graphs! Revise using different resources such as videos, podcasts, documentaries or online quizzes. Personally, I would recommend using flash cards to highlight topics that you’ve found challenging or difficult to remember.

Past exam papers….

Attempt as many past papers as possible. Do them in silence and time yourself as this will be able to help you with time management. You’ll also learn how much time you’ll need to allocate to each question as this is an important part of the exam. Some students concentrate on questions for too long and they are not able to answer all of them. Time management during the exam is a key! Going through many past papers will also increase your confidence.

Revise with friends

Revising with friends is always a good idea as this is an opportunity to share a knowledge, ask questions and get answers! Go through each section and previous past exam papers.

Take breaks

It is important to be patient so don’t drive yourself crazy. If you don’t understand some definitions or graphs, make a note of them and come back to it later. Look for additional resources online and don’t be afraid to ask your teacher or friends.

Happy Revising!



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