I didn’t get a C in Maths or English GCSE; what do I do now?

Mark Maclaine

August 20, 2014

Maths and English GCSE results can have an impact on your choice of university degree course, as well as your future job. Many universities and workplaces require a minimum C grade in both… BUT don’t worry if you haven’t achieved this; you do have a few options.

Contact Your College

If you are planning to continue on to higher education (A-Levels, Level 3) contact your sixth form college as soon as possible. Your college may let you resit the GSCE alongside studying for your advanced level subjects; some will even offer extra support to help you with the re-sit.

Speak to Your Teacher

If you are not planning to stay in education, or your college doesn’t offer GCSE resits, you should speak to your current Maths or English teacher. Your school may allow you to take resits there, or recommend other institutions that do.

Advice on Resits

Speak to your teachers and college before deciding to re-sit. Many students do far better in re-sits, but your teacher will know your capabilities well. If your teacher really believes you won’t improve, it might not be worth the effort. Resitting exams is difficult, especially if you’re resitting alongside your AS Levels; it can be lonely and will increase your workload.

You don’t need to have lessons in school to do a resit; you can always just get private GCSE maths tuition, GCSE English language, GCSE English literature or combined GCSE English tuition and enter as an External Candidate. Most maths tutors and English tutors will be able to help you with this.

Request a Remark

You can get your paper remarked if you feel it has been marked incorrectly. You need to ask your school or exam centre to submit an EAR (enquiry about results) by 20th September 2014. Bear in mind that your score could go down as well as up, and the remark score is final; so if you’re just a few marks above a grade boundary this is a risky approach. The general rule is that the more subjective the subject is, the more chance the score could change: ie you’re less likely to get a change for Maths or Science subjects than for English or Humanties subjects (ask your teacher’s opinion!)

 

If you didn't acquire the grades you were hoping on the A Levels, read our blog post to see what your next steps should be.